JIM WEST’S DINOSAURS
combines classical music, puppet construction and facts about dinosaurs into an engaging and funny performance for children age 4-12. The show breaks down into four parts:

• Building a Tyrannosaurus Rex (music by Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition; Baba-Yaga)

• A shadow tale about the Overaptor (music by Ravel, Grofe, Mussorgsky, Richard Strauss, and Ibert)

• A story of a little Brachiosaurus, (music by Stravinsky, Prokofiev, and Mahler)

• The finale, with the construction of a huge Apatosaurus (music by Mahler: Symphony No. 1 - Second Movement)
In-between the sections, our host, Fossil, a small blue dinosaur puppet, interacts with Jim as he searches for his identity and new dino facts.

The information we have about dinosaurs is constantly changing and new information is being unearthed daily. In fact, a NEW dinosaur is discovered every seven weeks, adding to the over 800 types of dinosaurs we have already cataloged.

SO HOW OLD IS EVERYTHING?
The oldest Shark fossils are 450 Million Years old; no Dinosaurs are that old. Dinosaurs lived during The Mesozoic age, from 248-65 million years ago. The Mesozoic breaks down into three periods, Triassic (248-208) Jurassic (208-144) and Cretaceous (144-65) The word Dinosaur was coined in 1842 by Sir Richard Owen from two Greek words, deinos, and sauros, it literally means, terrible lizard.

Here is a list of the dinosaurs in the show, and the years they were around.

Stegosaurus (STEG-uh-sawr-us) up to 200 Million Years Old

Brachiosaurus (BRAK-ee-uh-sawr-us) 170 to 135 Million Years Old

Apatasaurus (ah-PAT-uh-sawr-us) 160 to 110 Million Years Old

Allosaurus (AL-uh-sawr-us) 155 to 115 Million Years Old

Protocerotops (Pro-to-SER-uh-tops) 130 to 110 Million Years Old

Tyranasaurus (tye-RAN-uh-swar-us) 125 to 85 Million Years Old

Oviraptor (OV-ih-rap-tor) 70 Million Years Old

The Pterodactyl is not actually a dinosaur, but a Pterosaur, a "cousin" of the dinosaur. They lived from the Late Triassic all the way through the cretaceous period. Turtles were not dinosaurs either, but were contemporaries of them, as were Crocodiles.

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